RROI News – Rainbow Research Optics

SPIE Photonics West 2018

SPIE Photonics West 2018

Rainbow Research Optics, Inc. (RROI) is pleased to announce that we will be exhibiting at SPIE Photonics West in San Francisco, from January 30th to February 1st. Visit us and receive a gift to show our gratitude for your support.

Photonics West, the world’s largest photonics technologies event. Every year over 20,000 people come to hear the latest research and find the latest devices and systems driving new technologies that enable advancements in global healthcare, security, manufacturing, transportation, and more.

Reserve time to talk by emailing sales@rr-optics.com. We’re looking forward to seeing you!

The Moscone Center | San Francisco, CA
January 30th to February 1st, 2018
Booth #1906

SHOT Show Supplier Showcase

SHOT Show Supplier Showcase

Rainbow Research Optics, Inc. (RROI) is pleased to announce that we will be exhibiting at the SHOT Show Supplier Showcase in Las Vegas, from January 22nd to the 23rd. Visit us and receive a gift to show our gratitude for your support.

SHOT Show, the Shooting, Hunting, Outdoor Trade Show and Conference is the largest and most comprehensive trade show for all professionals involved with the shooting sports, hunting and law enforcement industries. It is the world’s premier exposition of combined firearms, ammunition, law enforcement, cutlery, outdoor apparel, optics and related products and services.

Reserve time to talk by emailing sales@rr-optics.com. We’re looking forward to seeing you!

Palazzo Ballroom, 5th Floor | Venetian Hotel Meeting Rooms, Las Vegas
January 22nd to 23rd, 2018
Booth #TBD

http://shotshow2017.csgcreative.com/supplier-showcase/

The Great American Eclipse of 2017

The Great American Eclipse of 2017

The Great American Eclipse

On August 21, 2017, America will see it’s first total eclipse since May 28, 1900. It’s incredibly rare to have a total eclipse pass over North America. Most are lucky to see an event like this just once in a lifetime.

Witnessing an event like this reminds us of our humility, and the overwhelming power of the sun. It makes us look up in awe and wonder about the cosmos.

So, grab your ISO 12312-2 certified viewer, request August 28th off from work, and lets experience this amazing event together!

What is a total solar eclipse?

A total solar eclipse is when the new moon comes between the Sun and Earth and casts the darkest part of its shadow called the umbra.

How can a total eclipse be used for science? 

Total eclipses aren’t just fun to witness, they provide opportunities for science. Throughout history eclipses influenced important scientific discoveries. Such as the discovery of the element Helium. NASA funds special projects during eclipses and so do many universities.

The Solar Corona

One of the coolest parts of viewing a total solar eclipse is, you can see the suns outer atmosphere (the solar corona) without special equipment. When viewed properly, the corona glows brilliantly around the moon, glimmering out into space.

Which parts of the country will it pass over directly?

The shadow of the eclipse will start off in the northwest and head towards South Carolina as seen below.

Courtesy of NASA

Best Cities To View From

Madras, Oregon
Snake River Valley, Idaho
Casper, Wyoming
Sandhills of Western Nebraska
St. Joseph, Missouri
Cabondale, Illonois
Hopkinsville, Kentucky
Nashville, Tennessee
Great Smoky Mountains Natl. Park
Columbia, South Carolina

What if I’m not in the direct path?

Don’t get bummed out if you live outside the umbra, you will still get to enjoy it. Depending on how far you are from the path you will see a different fraction of the eclipse. You will not see the full eclipse if you are not in the direct path – only a partial view. It’s still going to be cool! So make sure to mark your calendar and tell your kids.

I recommend you travel as close to the path as possible for the best experience.

Don’t Get Burned!

As redundant as it is to say, never look directly at the sun, even if it is during an eclipse. It could cause severe damage and complete blindness. Your eclipse glasses or handheld viewer MUST have the ISO 12312-2 safety standard logo directly on it. If your viewer doesn’t have this, throw it away now. The risk isn’t worth it. Same goes for photography equipment, be careful about using filters that aren’t appropriate.

Photographing the event

You can take pictures of a total eclipse, providing you take certain precautions. Even if the sun is 99.9% covered by the moon, the remaining .1% could damage your eyes or camera lens. You will need a proper solar filter to get the job done. Filters passing light with a wavelength of 656 nm are suggested.  You can find many decent solar filters by searching online.

Article by: Jay Hanna

If you work in the optics industry, contact RROI for custom optics made to meet your exact requirements. We have over 22 years’ experience and offer the most competitive pricing with the highest quality standards.

Here are some other articles about eclipses you may like:
How a solar eclipse first proved Einstein right
Myths and superstitions around solar eclipses

SPIE Optics + Photonics 2017

SPIE Optics + Photonics 2017

Rainbow Research Optics, Inc. (RROI) is pleased to announce that we will be exhibiting at the SPIE Optics + Photonics Show in San Diego, from August 8th to the 10th. Visit us and receive a gift to show our gratitude for your support. SPIE Optics + Photonics, the meeting where the latest research in optical engineering and applications, nanotechnology, sustainable energy, organic photonics, and astronomical instrumentation is presented.

Reserve time to talk by emailing sales@rr-optics.com. We’re looking forward to seeing you!

San Diego Convention Center | San Diego, California
August 8th to August 10th
Booth #856

http://spie.org/conferences-and-exhibitions/optics-and-photonics

SPIE Photonics West Show 2017

SPIE Photonics West Show 2017

SPIE is the worlds largest multidisciplinary event that focuses on photonics technologies.  Every year over 20,000 people come to hear the latest research and find the latest devices and systems driving technology markets.

photonicswestRainbow Research Optics, Inc. (RROI) is pleased to announce that we will be exhibiting at the SPIE Photonics West Show in San Francisco, from January 31st to February 2nd. Visit us and receive a gift to show our gratitude for your support.

Want to reserve some time to talk? Email us at sales@rr-optics.com.

We are looking forward to seeing you!

The Moscone Center
San Francisco, California
January 31, 2017 to February 2, 2017
Booth #2305

http://spie.org/conferences-and-exhibitions/photonics-west

Understanding a Convex Lens

Understanding a Convex Lens

A lens is a piece of transparent material bound by two surfaces of which at least one is curved. A lens bound by two spherical surfaces bulging outwards is called a bi-convex lens or simply a convex lens. A single piece of glass that curves outward and converges the light incident on it is also called a convex lens. They are both thicker in middle than near the edges. A lens bound by two spherical surfaces curved inwards is called a bi-concave lens or simply a concave lens. It is thinner in the middle than the edges.

 The central point of a lens is called its optical center. It is usually represented by the letter “o”. For these lenses convex or concave, each surface forms a part of a sphere. The straight line passing through the optical center in the centers of these spheres is called the principle axis.The principle axis is perpendicular to the surfaces of the lens. The effective diameter of a spherical lens is called its aperture. It determines the amount of light that passes through the lens.

To help understand the refraction of light through a convex lens, imagine a convex lens as an arrangement of a number of portions of triangular prisms with a very small glass slab at the center. The base of each prism points towards the principle axis of the lens. We know that a ray of light incident on a prism bends towards its base then emerges out. When a beam of light parallel to the principle axis strikes the lens these rays undergo refraction as they enter the lens and leave it.

convex_lensFirst, they bend towards the base of the respective prisms and then emerge bending towards the principle axis. Thus, after refraction through the lens they converge to a point on the principle axis on the other side of the lens. This point is called the focal point or principle focus of the lens, and is usually denoted by the letter F. Because a convex lens concentrates the light rays that are incident on it, it is called a converging lens.

The bending of rays is maximal at the top and bottom of the lens. This is because the top and bottom prisms have the greatest angle between the refracting surfaces. As we move towards the principle axis this angle reduces. This causes a decrease in bending of the rays. At the center no bending occurs as the glass bases are parallel. The ray through the optical center emerges un-deviated along its original direction.

The distance from the optical center to the focal point is called the focal length of the lens. According to the sign convention the focal length of the convex lens is positive. Thicker lenses having greater curvature bend the light more and thus have shorter focal length. Thicker convex lenses have more converging power.

If the parallel beams incident on the lens are inclined to the principle axis they converge after refraction to certain points to a plane containing the focal point. The plane passing through all such points perpendicular to the principle axis is called the focal plane of the lens. What if light rays parallel to the principle axis are incident on the other side? The lens will have the same effect on light incident from the other side. Therefore, a convex lens has two focal points usually represented by F1 and F2, one on each side equidistant from the optical center. According to the principle of reversibility of light, a ray of light passing through the focal point of a convex lens emerges on the other side parallel to its principle axis.

Let us now discuss how a convex lens forms images. For different positions of the object a convex lens forms images of varying sizes and nature at different locations. Convex lenses are therefore used in instruments like cameras, telescopes, etc. to form images that we see with our eye, which itself has a lens.

Rainbow Research Optics, Inc. (RROI) offers a variety of custom and stock convex and concave lenses. Send us your quote requests today!